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Rolls Royce to provide 38 AE1107C engines in support of USMC's MV-22 Osprey aircraft fleet

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World Defense & Security Industry News - Rolls Royce
 
 
Rolls Royce to provide 38 AE 1107C engines in support of USMC's MV-22 Osprey aircraft fleet
 
Rolls-Royce Corp., Indianapolis, Indiana, is being awarded an $87,712,436 contract for the procurement of 38 AE1107C engines in support of the MV-22 Osprey tiltrotor aircraft for the United States Marine Corps. Work will be performed in Indianapolis, Indiana, and is expected to be completed in December 2016. The US Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity.
     
Rolls-Royce Corp., Indianapolis, Indiana, is being awarded an $87,712,436 contract for the procurement of 38 AE1107C engines in support of the MV-22 Osprey tiltrotor aircraft for the United States Marine Corps. Work will be performed in Indianapolis, Indiana, and is expected to be completed in December 2016. The US Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity. Rolls Royce's AE 1107C engine
     
Produced by two major manufacturers Bell and Boeing, the MV-22 Osprey is a joint service multi-role combat aircraft utilizing tiltrotor technology to combine the vertical performance of a helicopter with the speed and range of a fixed wing aircraft. The Osprey can carry 24 combat troops, or up to 20,000 pounds of internal cargo or 15,000 pounds of external cargo, at twice the speed of a helicopter. It features a cross-coupled drive system so either engine can power the rotors if one engine fails.

The AE 1107C engine shares a common core with the Rolls-Royce AE family of engines, which totals more than 62 million flight hours of service and includes nearly 6,000 total engines in military and commercial service. The Rolls-Royce AE 1107C engine is robust and battle-proven, demonstrating reliability during deployments across the Mideast, Africa and the Pacific.

In September 2013, Rolls-Royce announced it had increased the AE 1107C engine's power by 17 percent via the adoption of a new Block 3 turbine, an increase in fuel valve flow capacity, and accompanying software updates. The upgrade should increase the reliability in high-altitude, high-heat conditions and boost maximum payload limitations from 6,000 ft to 8,000 ft. A Block 4 upgrade is reportedly being examined, which may increase power by up to 26 percent, producing close to 10,000 hp, and improve fuel consumption.